About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 47
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 49
MSNBCW 40
CSPAN 30
CNNW 28
CSPAN2 19
FBC 16
FOXNEWS 14
KQED (PBS) 11
CNBC 9
KCSM (PBS) 7
KRCB (PBS) 7
KGO (ABC) 6
MSNBC 6
CNN 5
LINKTV 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 297
French 2
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 303 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington, tonight on "washington week." more red lines crossed in syria. >> what we've seen indicates big eventis clearly a of grave concern. when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and, again, we're still gathering our information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> there's no reason, if there's hide, for the regime not to let the investigative team in. gwen: more tough choices in egypt. >> what we're doing right now is theg a full evaluation of u.s.-egyptian relationship. >> we have the same objective. to see a democratic system in place in egypt. it ahn mccain and i called coup because that's exactly what it is. gwen: and new disclosures about ofernment surveillance american citizens. >> i think that the trust of the american people in their at staket is what's here. gwen: a trio of late summer dilemmas, plus -- 50 year later, we look back at the march may have changed america. gjelten the week, tom of npr, alexis simendinger of real clear politics and michael fletcher of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, coveri
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
reporting. >>> also tonight, 50 years after the march on washington, old warriors and a new generation unite to consider the long path of progress and the road ahead. this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. >> caller: the water -- it requires this new warning. >> the pressure tonight continues to build on syria as other nations demand an investigation into suspicions of a chemical weapons attack. you've seen those gruesome pictures that show hundreds of dead men, women and children and they have raised alarm. while other violence have claimed many more lives and many more made homeless. >>> the united nations reports that child refugees have reached 1 million and satellite images of the az zaaingstari refugee camp. >> the united nations says over half the syrian refugees in jordan are under the age o
economy. they are making huge investments. one of the problems in washington is due to the tea party. the tea party wants to have a sequester an across-the-board cuts. with to stop that mentality. we are investments to infrastructures -- we have to stop that mentality. we have to make investments to infrastructure. development, we have used our strack structure -- our tax structure to bring back jobs from overseas. chinese used cap structured and subsidies to encouragement and faxing. manufacturing can come back to unite states, but we have to encourage it. companies cannot move their money overseas. companies will stay here and ofufactured here because transportation cost. we're not doing that. we have to make a difference. >> that let me to where i want to go. there are those who say that it is time for america to do something to jumpstart our economic recovery. 162,000 jobs disappointed wall street. we had to do something with our tax code to reflect the need of a modern-day economy. i harken back to the days when i was a young reporter covering bill bradley who came up with the f
the dream and the dreamer 50 years later. >> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to >> yeah 7. >> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
the march on washington, looking back and remembering both the dream and the dreamer. >> and the army doctor turned killer, a jury decides whether he lives or if he dies. >> the syrian government now calling on the u.n. to investigate chemical weapons on syrian army soldiers. syrian ambassadors gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention there. meanwhile u.n. chemical inspectors continue their investigation into the august 21st attack i in a suburb of damascus. prime minister david cameron calling for meetings. >>> joining us now for the latest diplomat i can updates. do we now know what was on the draft resolution on the part of the british government? >> we don't. no one is leaking over this. normally there are a few leaks, but on this occasion we really don't know what is in this document. to be clear there was a meeting in the side room involving the five permanent security council. the united kingdom, the united states, france, russia, and china. there was also a meeting taking place, and i it's still going on at the u.n. involving haiti. after either of those meeti
, that is the future we must move toward no matter where it is. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> hello, again, a look at our top stories now. in california, a raging wildfire is exploding in size and spreading inside the yosemite national park. it has been 50 years on the east coast since martin luther king jr. made his famous speech and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to secelebre that historic event and marian berry joining us live later on this hour. in california, a wildfire is burning almost out of control through parts of the state. the rim fire is burning so fast, it has doubled in size in a day. the fire has also spread to the western edge of the park. nick has been following developments for us. >> reporter: fred, is sun has come up here and it's given us a fresh perspective of how devastating the fire has been. this goes back a couple hundred yards at least and it's going things like this, scorching the earth and singeing the edges. at least 126,000 acres burned and it's been very unforgiving in its pattern. you see here, fire completely jumped over this road, scorched
one. span, we bring a public affair of events from washington to you. white house readings and conferences. gaveling complete gavel-to- coverage of the house. c-span, created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now, you can watch us in hd. >> a look at the unfolding situation in syria and how humanitarian efforts are being carried out. million refugees have left for neighboring countries. from washington journal, this is 20 minutes. host: joining us next is dr. ron waldman, president of doctors of the world usa, joining us to talk about the group's activities among the world with refugees, in particular the syrian refugee camp from which he has recently returned. thank you for being with us. this is a photo in this week's "new york" magazine with an article and a photograph of a camp. it is open two weeks. it is now home to 120,000 people. the population of hartford, conn. you were recently at this camp. it looks like largely a tent city. what was your experience like? guest: a very large encampment of refugees. it is
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
washington, there is a march -- a reenactment about a mile east of here at the base of the capitol, that's where they will begin retracing the steps that were taken 50 years ago. we have heard from senator angus kaine, joaquin castro from san antonio, texas, and a highlight so far as been the music. two-thirds of the trio peter paul and mary sang blowing in the wind. and un ambassador, major of atlanta, he got up there and belted out some spiritual songs that were popular in the heyday of the civil rights moment. at this moment we're hearing from the widow of med -- med ger evers. and earlier we heard from melanie campbell. she had some very strong words about a topic that is on the forefront of many people's minds here today. let's listen. >> today racism and inequality does not manifest itself in a white sheet, jim crow laws, poll taxes or barking dogs, but the dogs are still biting in other ways. today there are no white sheets, but there are judges in black robes in the u.s. supreme court who struck down section 4 of the voting rights act, opening the flood gates in many states to p
washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings, and conferences and offering complete apple to gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry 35 years ago and funded by your local cable and satellite provider. .ow, you can watch us in hd >> turning to serious health -- the u.s. has confirmed it has reached an agreement with the syrian government to allow inspectors to visit the site of an alleged emma: attack a suite near damascus. the date and times still need to be worked out. opposition groups and doctors without borders say more than 300 people were killed. u.s. lawmakers talked about those attacks on the sunday news shows. on fox news sunday, corker and eliot talk more about the issue. i think we will respond in a surgical way and i hope the president, as soon as we get back to washington, will ask for authorization from congress to do something in a very surgical and proportional way, something that gets their attention and causes them to underst
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s historic speech on civil rights. captioning funded by cbs good morning. good to be with you. the obama administration is gearing up for military action against syria, possibly within days. as early as today the u.s. could release an intelligence report directly linking the assad regime to chemical weapons attack against syrian civilians. defense secretary chuck hagel says u.s. forces are ready, and the white house says the goal of the military strike is not regime change. alfonso is live with more. good morning, alfonso. >> in fact, united nations inspectors are back on the search for evidence of a poisonous gas attack outside the syrian capital this morning. at the same time there are four u.s. navy destroyers in position m mediterranean, and they're within range of syrian targets. >> reporter: rebels that may get a boost from western air strikes any day now. washington is rallying international support for action against the assad regime for its alleged
is to prevent chemical weapons from being deployed. >> mike viquera in washington. >>> opposition leader general sallim edris about the three-year conflict. must aftoustapha helped organiz trip. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> did senator john mccain indicate any american involvement during that trip back in may? >> during his trip, senator mccain, who had been long an advocate for greater leadership in the forklift of syria, on behalf of the syrian revolution and the people discussed the need for greater leadership and intervention by the united states but stated the sort of political realities in washington and that at the end of the day, the decision remains the president's, but he assured in multiple meetings including with general hadris that he continued to work in congress and in the senate to add more pressure on administration to act. >> have members of congress been in contact since the alleged checkcal we hope attack >> as far as i know, since the weaponstac that happened a few days ago, there has been no contact between members of congress and him directly, but i wouldn
the argument that the world needs to do something but only to a opinion. patty culhane. al jazeera washington. >> mike, the administration direction has changed drastically, what happened? >> that is a testament to not only the power of the images, the horrific images but the testament to the power and ability to distribute those images. remember this happened last wednesday. thursday the president gave an uf statement that says we need to act within the auspices of international law. then the need for international inspectors, then the images continued to pour in. the international investigators set, assad needs to let the investigators in. the administration says there is little doubt that assad was responsible then yesterday we heard that extremely strong statements from secretary kerry in part to galvanize public opinion where he called it a moral obscenity and culminated by today where joe biden said there's no doubt the assad regime is responsible. >> mike, the american people are wary of any military involvement in syria. how does the president sell this military action? >> what's impo
on washington from august 1963. martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech. the conservative media in our country, mostly yesterday, tried to pretend that anniversary was not happening. they spent last night complaining bitterly there were no republicans on stage a the 50th anniversary event. republicans weren't invited. today was the day when the conservative media finally bothered to fwogoogle the thing they were complaining about after the fact to realize tons of republicans were invited to be on the stage at the march on washington, it's just that every single one of them said no. the first president bush said no for health reasons. the second president bush said no also presumably for health reasons. jeb bush said no as well, because i don't know. as did john boehner. as did republican house majority leader eric cantor who has been trying to reinvent himself as the republican vaguely friendly toward sieve rights. eric cantor this year marched with john lewis at the re-enactment of the selma march at the edmund pettus bridge. he's been trying to improve his image on civil rights. when
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
. grew up in washington, d c -- d.c. she knew dolley madison when she was a little girl. they went to st. john's church on lafayette square. when she was 5-10 years old, she knew dolly madison. her father was a very famous naval commandants who took a ship on a commercial ship that went down. it was an act of bravery because he made sure that all the passengers on board got off a first. his widow and his daughter, their only child, then living in new york city were given all sorts of awards, a monument to him at annapolis naval academy. alan arthur is really interesting. she does not become first lady, but she influences the administration. very similar to racial jackson jacksonl the way that she was the ghost, the memory of her. chester arthur made several appointments, four we know of, specifically of people who had known his wife. one was a cousin in the office of the attorney general made assistant attorney general. another was in the treasury. it was very controversial that he named the superintendent of the naval academy, he appointed a friend of theirs, a childhood friend of his w
of the invasion with iraq. washington said any action it takes would be based on national security needs. >> in london, a big cameron has been laying out his case for military intervention as parliament there debates the issue. >> lively debate in london's house of commons as lawmakers debate whether britain should intervene with military measures in syria. prime minister david cameron said the use of chemical weapons in syria demanded a strong response. he said britain would exhaust all the options but warned that his government was not prepared to insist on unanimous support. >> you could have a situation in a country where it's country was literally annihilating people in the country, but because of one veto on the security council you would be hampered from taking any action. >> the opposition labor party is expected to vote against the government motion, which asks parliament to approve military action in principle. a second vote still be necessary to authorize a tax. that will not be before united nations inspectors in serial finish their work. on saturday, they are to leave the co
in a few days, if washington goes soon it could find itself acting alone. >> the briefing just broke up. has the white house got the backing he needs here at home, if not abroad? like that is a question that will be answered in the coming hours. what we do know is smooth the evidence they presented, they actually said that bashar al- assad's brother may have been involved in the chemical weapons attack alleged on eastern damascus. they said they have intercepted some sort of calls and such removal in before the attack as well. this has not swayed some members of congress, key members of congress. we had bob corker, he says there should be a vote. the libyan campaign, there was no vote for action. >> nathan king in our washington newsroom, thanks. to the united kingdom. it was supposed to be a chance for members of parliament to vote for a british-backed military intervention in syria within days. instead, mp's voted to reject military action. the boat leaves the u.k.'s foreign policy in syria in question. divisions run deep inside of parliament and among the public. >> syrians outside o
, all eyes on washington and the state department. that's because secretary of state john ker seset to make a remark on the situation in in syria. his comments come after u.n. investigators completed an inspection of chemical weapons attacks today in and around damascus. the u.n. saying investigators interviewing survivors and doctors and collecting samples before returning to their hotel, but not until after there was a sniper that forced them at one point in time to rey treat. we go to washington. bring us up-to-date. >> reporter: all along in the five days since that chemical attack and the horrific images out of syria to television and computer screens worldwide, the administration from the president down stress any option or retaliation exercised must be of an inter national nature. of we know that john kerry had at least two dozen phone calls with his counterparts around the region and world including the syrian foreign minister on saturday. he spoke with the 4 french and the foreign ministers from a number of gulf states. the united states doesn't want to go this alone and br
're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final moments of freedom for the surviving boston marathon bombing suspect. >> on this day in 1963, martin luther king jr. delivered h famous i have a dream speech. >> president obama among those who will speak at a cere
in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwilling to militarily intervene in syria, despite the deaths of more than 100,000 people and a vow he made more than one year ago. >> that's a red line for us. and that there would be enormous consequences if we start seeing movement on the chemical weapons front. >> with that line possibly crossed, senator john mccain
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
. >> stirring words and a call to action. will this march on washington affect change, especially when it comes to voting rights? the burden of history, what should the president say to the nation this week? 50 years after martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech. in florida, the saga of a teenage girl and her underage love interest takes a new twist. we'll tell you what she did that landed her in jail. >>> hello, everyone, it's high noon in the east and 9:00 in the west. i'm mara schiavocampo in for alex witt. >>> developing news out of syria right now, the syrian government reached an agreement with the united nations to allow inspectors to visit the site of an alleged chemical attack last week. word just a short time ago from a u.n. spokesman saying inspections will begin tomorrow. a senior white house official tells nbc news the decision by the syrian government is, quote, too late to be credible and says any evidence has likely been damaged or destroyed by continued bombings. meanwhile, the syrian government warned that any military intervention by the united states would set the middl
. obama can be. >> heckled over health care and questioned about his citizenship. why is "the washington post" targeting senator ted cruz. wasn't the post upset about so-called birthers questioning president obama. nina easton and brad blakeman join us on the left wing media assault on ted cruz. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of course i had no idea what it was. i felt like my feet were going to sleep. it progressed from there to burning... to like 1,000 bees that were just stinging my feet. [ female announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause rious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right ay if you have ese, new or rsening depression, or unusual changes in md or behavior. orwelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores friabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swling of hands, legs and ft. don't ink alcohol
washington, an active and emotional day as well. libby? reporter: the speeches and march for today are over, but there are still a lot of people here in the mall and a feeling of community spirit. many people i have talked to have at some point today gone down to the monument on the mall that commemorates martin luther king, jr. they wanted a moment to thing about -- think about his legacy. earlier, i talked to his son, martin luther king, iii, and asked him what his father would think about today. >> you know, i think, again, dad would first be very proud that americans came together to elect an african-american president. but that was not the full filament of his dream. that was certainly an important milestone. in fact, he even predicted that we would have a ang-african-american president probably 10 years before it happened, he and robert kennedy predicted it in their life. so they were able to see it because they were visionaries. but he would be proud of the fact that there are some individuals who are doing very well in corporate america, xerox has an african-american ceo. american e
into the national mall here in washington, d.c. the day was hot, they marched through the nation's capital. they were standing in the sun mopping sweat from their brows when the moment arrived, when dr. martin luther king jr. shared his dream. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >>> it became clear that day with it wasn't clear already that change was coming. this was the scene at the national mall on that day, august 28th, 1963. and this was the scene at the mall today. on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years since dr. king took the podium with a vision of abraham lincoln looking on from the memorial perch. the king family rang a bell at the mall in unison with bells at more than 300 sites across the country from alabama to alaska at the very hour that dr. king implored the nation to led freedom ring. in washington they say it's a great drizly late summer day, but no way it would stop this crowd from coming out.
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
. if this is a strategy what is the strategy? >> lindy is an old roommate from mine of washington, d.c. and i've had several discussions with him that both of us disagree on. the strategy has to be this. my concern friends will get mad a at me i do agree with governor rendell. we have to talk about the issues important to the country and say how do we get real solutions and conservative principles and take this to this administration and the democrats that control the senate to get things done. talking about these issues like an impeachment that are not going to happen doesn't help that agenda and it doesn't help us, not only in policy on, but it doesn't help us in politics next november. >> always a pleasure, gentlemen. have a fantastic weekend. >> you too, craig. >>> president obama is on the road again today to promote his plan to make higher education more affordable. day two of his bus tour takes him to binghamton. followed by a stop at a college in scranton, pennsylvania. catch his town hall here on msnbc at 12:45 today. remember we are hours away from the expected resignation of san diego may
to say it's not always washington's priority. a good job with good wages, a good education, a home of your own, cornerstones of what it means to be middle class. what's become a barrier, the soaring cost of higher education. this country is only as strong as our next generation. if you work hard, study hard, and are responsible, here in america, you can make it if you try. >>> even as this pecks increasingly crucial to get into the middle class, the cost of a college education is going further and further out of reach. with the average student borrower graduating more than $26,000 in dead. at the university of buffalo today, the president said that has to change. >> higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility. if we don't do something about keeping it within reach, it will create problems for economic mobility for generations to come. that's not acceptable. >>> to help make that change hahn happen, the president is propose a plan to tie federal aid to the schools offering, using a variety of metrics to reward the schools helping students from all -- if enacted it w
.s. president barack obama has made it clear washington is in no rush to intervene in serious. >> that's right. on friday, he called the apparent gassing of hundreds of serious civilians troubling and a big event of grave concern, but he offered no sign that the u.s. military will move to stop the civil war war. >> on the ground, human inspectors have yet to investigate the attack. they blame the rebels for blocking the investigation. >> we have a report, and again, the images may disturb some viewers. >> revels in aleppo say they have seen enough. they accuse the al-assad regime of killing hundreds of civilians with poison gas. >> the international community does not care about the killings. president obama said using chemical weapons is a red line. this line has been crossed a thousand times over. >> u.s. president barack obama has been facing increasing pressure to act, but his latest statements to broadcaster cnn were cautious. the united states continues to be the one country that people expect can do more than just simply protect their borders, but that does not mean that we have to get
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 303 (some duplicates have been removed)